Monday 18th June 2018
HometennisBallsPenn Pressureless 48-Ball Bucket

Penn Pressureless 48-Ball Bucket

Penn Pressureless 48-Ball Bucket

  • Price : $39.99
  • Product Rating :
    Tennis Stuff - 4.5
  • Penn Pressureless 48-Ball Bucket : Tennis Balls : Sports & Outdoors.. More

Product Reviews

Rating: 
Amazon Price: $49.99 $39.99 You save: $10.00 (20%). (as of June 17, 2018 9:25 am – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Practice every stroke in your arsenal without fetching balls after every third stroke with the Penn Pressureless 48-ball bucket. Ideal for ball machines and individual practice, the balls are made of high-quality felt, giving them the same action and feel you've come to expect from Penn. The reusable plastic bucket, meanwhile, includes a handle for easy transport.

Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 9.4 pounds
  • Domestic Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • International Shipping: This item can be shipped to select countries outside of the U.S. Learn More
  • Origin:  China
  • ASIN: B0019Y52MM
  • Item model number: 521835

Customer Reviews

OK but maybe not the best available

 on June 6, 2016
By Neil R
I have used the Tretorn Micro X balls for a number of years and decided to give these Penn balls a try. After using them for a month, I have concluded that the Tretorn balls are superior. These Penn balls weight the exact same as a regulation ball, but feel heavy when hit. They also deflect more under pressure than a regulation ball. They do behave exactly the same in a ball machine as the Tretorn balls. One interesting characteristic of these balls is that they emit a loud and satisfying “crack” when hit, which makes it sound like your shot is more powerful than it really is; kids might like this. I think they feel less natural than the Treetorn balls when served. Other reviews comment on the visible seams on these Penn balls, which are present but I don’t think have any effect on play. I plan to switch back to the Tretorn balls, but I note they are no longer available on Amazon.

Great pressureless balls!

 on August 9, 2016
By A. Dowdy
Great practice balls for the kids. We have a college-aged club player and a high school player… We have purchased these Penn Pressureless balls for them every year, and they have held up well in the Arizona heat on tough, hard courts. They do not have the bounce that pressurized balls have, but they are not terribly far off and, for the money, I would rather not spend hundreds on pressurized balls every year when our kids are not professionals. For a durable practice ball that the average player can use without issue, this is the way to go.

1) Some balls bounce better than others 2) The balls feel a bit heavier …

 on October 19, 2017
By Louis Scott Bolt
These are OK. The quality varies from ball to ball though. After a month of using them, I have noticed a few things:

Good tennis balls

 on July 27, 2016
By SimpleShapes
Excellent pressureless tennis balls. The feel great in hand. The bounce is not as springy high as a freshly opened tennis ball, but perfectly fine for practice or even friendly game use. One thing to note, they are quite louder than regular tennis balls which may be good or bad depending on how you view it, but I like the sound of hitting the ball.

Good balls for use in a ball machine

 on July 29, 2017
By Charles S.
These pressure less balls work much better than the first ones I bought at Amazon. They have a more consistent bounce. The bucket makes a nice container for storage.

Best Pressureless Balls

 on September 23, 2009
By Tennis Dad
I have used Gamma, Tretorn and Penn pressureless balls and these are the best of the bunch – by a mile. Pressureless balls are firmer than regular balls on off-center and frame shots, but these are not at all objectionable to me and my kids. I have used Penn pressureless balls for instruction, ball machines, and in practice games, including at high altitude. They work great for all purposes. In fact, Penn has perfected pressureless balls to a level where they should price and market them as the primary ball for recreational (non-tournament) play. The fuzz on the Penn pressureless balls (and the other brands) holds up very well. My one gripe is that the lid on the Penn 48-ball bucket is a terrible design. Granted most people will put them in a hopper, but why go to the manufacturing expense of making a bucket and then not put a lid on it that: 1) opens without a crowbar; 2) stays open when you are using it; and, 3) secures down when you close it. So easy to improve, it seems like basic laziness on the part of the design team. In comparing Penn pressureless with Gamma and Tretorn, my experience is that Gamma balls bounce like they are “out-of-round” and get worse the longer they are stored on top of each other – great for improving your reflexes, but wierd to play (I ended up throwing them away while the fuzz was still good) – and Tretorns are like hitting bricks whether you hit on the sweet spot or off.

I love the bucket

 on August 15, 2016
By Nikki H.
I love the bucket! As for the balls, they are INCREDIBLY HEAVY-feeling when hitting. They do not bounce that much on hard court (compared to the Tourna pressure-less ball) and they definitely killing my elbow for the first week that I was getting used to them. This may be because they definitely seem to have a thicker more durable shell but I want practice balls that feel like real pressure balls, thus for that I suggest Tourna. I use both brands in my ball machine.

Great for longevity and getting the same bounce (if not feel) of a standard pressured tennis ball

 on December 16, 2017
By EricY
Great for use in a ball machine, in that they won’t get dead too quickly (we’ve had some for over 2 years). They are a bit harder than regular pressured balls, so if you have arm/elbow issues you may want to get a smaller sample to try them out.

Nice for frequent practice play.

 on May 17, 2013
By C. Cannaday
I recently purchased this bucket of pressureless tennis balls so that I don’t have to chase balls down as much when hitting around and practicing. They are great for general volleying and serving. I did notice that some of the balls are pretty weak and don’t have much bounce to them but most of them have been pretty good. I’ve been using them for about a month and so far so good with the majority of the balls. I would say out of 48 there may be 2-3 balls that seem pretty “dead.” The others don’t have as much bounce as a fresh can of pressure-packed balls would have, but they are not bad at all for casual tennis and practicing. I purchased a ball hopper as well and it’s amazing how handy that is! Enjoy!

Don’t buy it from Amazon

 on May 5, 2013
By L. Qi
These balls are high quality, I have been using them for years in my ball machine for my kids’ training. Ball machine generally abuses balls, but they last very long. They do eventually lose fuzz over time, but consider their low price, these are the most economical balls ever.

 

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